Academy Curricular Exchange
Columbia Education Center
Social Studies



TITLE:  GROUP NEWSPAPER PRESENTATIONS

AUTHOR:  JERI KELLEY, MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL, Orem, UT

GRADE LEVEL:  9-12

ACTIVITIES AND PROCEDURES:   In connection with my World War
I Unit, I assign a group presentation.  I assign the
membership in the groups to make sure that I have certain
strengths in each one.  Each group is given the task to
complete a newspaper that a person could read and learn a
great deal of pertinent information about World War I. The
groups are given some time (15 minutes the first day, 30
minutes the second day and 45 minutes the last day) in class
to work on these newspapers with access to computers
available.

Each group can decide how they want to approach this
assignment and the information that will be put in their
individual newspapers.  I give some suggestions, i.e.,
having each member choose a certain part of the paper to be
in charge of and the use of their World War I Outlines as to
how to get started, but mostly they are on their own so that
I don't stifle their creativity.


                      WORLD WAR I UNIT


REQUIRED ASSIGNMENTS:

____ 50 Points      1.   Worksheet #1--Chapter 23:
                         Call for World Leadership
____ 50 Points      2.   Worksheet #2--World War I:
                         Class Lecture
____ 50 Points      3.   Worksheet #3--World War I:Review
____ 25 Points      4.   Film Summary: The Great War
____100 Points**    5.   Group Newspaper Presentations**
____150 Points      6.   Final Examination: World War I

    425 POINTS      TOTAL POINTS FOR REQUIRED ASSIGNMENTS

OPTIONAL ASSIGNMENTS:

____ 25 Points      1.   Film Summary--Watch an old movie
                         about WWI and write a one page
                         summary.
____ 50 Points      2.   Interview someone who was a
                         child during WWI.  Type up the
                         interview and be prepared to
                         share highlights with the class.
                         The person will be around 80
                         years old.
____ 50 Points      3.   Put on a fashion show featuring
                         clothes from the WWI era.  You
                         may do this in groups but the
                         group cannot be larger than four
                         members.
____ 25 Points      4.   Sketch an automobile, house, or
                         article of clothing from the WWI
                         period.
____ 25 Points      5.   Lecture Notes.  Take notes on
                         your World War I Outlines and
                         turn them in neatly done.
____ 50 Points      6.   Create a game that will
                         adequately review the WWI
                         information you learned.
____ 50 Points      7.   Answer Chapter Review Questions
                         1-14 of Chapter 23 on page 544
                         in your text.
____ 50 Points      8.   Write a one-page report (typed)
                         that tells of life in America
                         during the WWI era.

   325 POINTS*     TOTAL POINTS FOR OPTIONAL ASSIGNMENTS*

*OPTIONAL ASSIGNMENT GRADING:

Although there are actually 325 points available for the
optional assignments, only 250 POINTS will go towards your
final total.

**GROUP NEWSPAPER PRESENTATIONS:

You will be paired in groups of 4 or 5.  You will publish a
newspaper with a variety of articles describing WWI.  Many
of these articles should expound on items listed in your
World War I Outlines.  Use your creative minds to illustrate
WWI to the rest of the class.  These newspapers will be
presented to the class (you should have enough copies of
your newspapers to provide each student with one paper).
Information from them will be introduced into the final
examination.


GRADING SCALE:      600 - 675 = A  TOTAL POINTS:
                    540 - 599 = B
                    470 - 539 = C
                    400 - 469 = D  LETTER GRADE:



                    WORLD WAR I OUTLINE

BALANCE OF POWER

European countries had developed nationalism: a belief that
one's language, customs, and homeland are better than one's
neighbors.

In 1871, Germany won a war with France and annexed the
French provinces of Alsace and Lorraine.  France wanted to
regain the territory and reunite the French speaking people.

Before 1870, Germany was a loose federation of states.  In
1870, Otto Von Bismarck united the states into a powerful
nation.  To protect his country the "Iron Chancellor" looked
for allies.  He found allies in Austria-Hungary and Italy.
They called themselves the Triple Alliance.

Britain, France, and Russia felt threatened by the triple
alliance and they became committed to each others mutual
defense.  They were called the Triple Entente.

NOTES:



OUTBREAK OF THE WAR

Serbia wanted to claim the territory Bosnia that was claimed
by Austria-Hungary.  In June 1914, a young revolutionary
killed Archduke Francis Ferdinand, hoping to frighten
Austria-Hungary in recognizing Serbia's claim to Bosnia.

On July 28, 1914, Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia.
Russia, a rival of Austria-Hungary, gathered troops to
defend Serbia and declared war on Germany.  Russia's ally
France supported Russia's action.

On August 1, 1914, Germany declared war on Russia, and on
August 3, 1914, declared war on France.  Germany and
Austria-Hungary planned to defeat France rapidly and then
turn east to attack Russia.

On August 4, 1914, Germany invaded neutral Belgium to get to
France.  Britain was committed to defend neutral Belgium.
The same day, Britain declared war on Germany and on August
12, it declared war on Austria-Hungary.

By the second week in August the five major European nations
were at war.

Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey, and the Balkan country of
Bulgaria became the Central Powers, because they were in the
center of Europe.  Britain, France, Russia, and Italy, and
their allies became known as the Allies.

Allies: Belgium, Brazil, British Empire, China, Costa Rica,
Cuba, France, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Italy,
Japan, Liberia, Montenegro, Nicaragua, Panama, Portugal,
Romania, Russia, San Marino, Serbia, Siam, United States.

NOTES:



AMERICAN NEUTRALITY

On August 4, 1914, President Wilson issued a proclamation of
neutrality and urged Americans to be impartial.  He wanted
the United States to be the mediator to bring peace to
Europe.

NOTES:



THE INVASION OF BELGIUM

For years Germany had prepared for war with France, and it
now had the best army in Europe.  THE BATTLE OF THE
MARNE was the first battle where the allies met the Germans
and forced them to retreat.

NOTES:



PROPAGANDA

Britain and Germany waged a different kind of war by
flooding the United States with propaganda hoping to sway
the public opinion to each side.  Most of what the U.S.
heard was through the mail.

NOTES:



THE BLOCKADE OF TRADE

Britain stopped neutral merchant ships headed to Germany.
The British illegally seized the ships and took the food.

American industry profited as it sold food, steel, oil, and
other supplies to the Europeans.

NOTES:



SUBMARINE WARFARE

Both Britain and Germany planted mines in the North Sea.  In
February 1915, the Germans announced a war zone in the
waters around Britain.  Enemy ships would be sunk on sight.

NOTES:



THE LUSITANIA

On May 7, 1915 a German submarine sank the Lusitania (a
British Liner), traveling from New York to London, 1,198
people died, of which, 128 were Americans.

NOTES:



THE PREPAREDNESS CAMPAIGN

In November 1915, Wilson announced his plan to build up the
American Army and Navy.

The Germans continued to fire on unarmed ships.  Wilson
threatened to break diplomatic relations with Germany.  The
Germans pledged to give warning before sinking Merchant
Ships.

Congress passed the National Defense Act that doubled the
size of the United States Army.

NOTES:



THE LAST STEPS TO WAR

On February 1, 1917, Germany announced that it would begin
again its unrestricted submarine warfare.

In March 1917, Revolutionaries in Russia overthrew the
Government.  They replaced the dictator with a Democratic
government.

On April 2, 1917, Wilson addressed a special session of
Congress and asked for a declaration of war against Germany.
The United States claimed they were going to war for the
cause of human rights.

NOTES:



THE DRAFT

On May 18, 1917, Congress passed the Selective Services Act.
The act required all men between the ages of 21 and 30 to
register for military service.  The ages were later changed
from 18 to 45.

NOTES:



RAISING MONEY

The massive military mobilization eventually cost about $36
billion.  The government raised money by selling liberty
bonds to the public.

NOTES:



INDUSTRY GOES TO WAR

New industry was spared in the United States to make war
artillery and send food clothing and shelter to the troops.
Many factories were converted to make things needed for the
war.

NOTES:



FOOD CONSERVATION

Herbert Hoover was appointed as head of the Food
Administration.  Americans were urged to conserve food and
eat all the left overs.  The sale of alcohol was prohibited
because all the grain was needed to make bread.

NOTES:



LABOR HELPS THE WAR EFFORT

As men went to war, women took their place in the factories.
Women wanted the right to vote.  In January 1918 the House
passed the 19th Amendment giving women the right to vote.

NOTES:



BUILDING SUPPORT FOR THE WAR

Congress tried to quiet dissent groups that opposed the war.
The Sedition Act passed in May 1918 and imposed severe
penalties on those who said anything that interfered with
the war effort.

NOTES:



THE AMERICAN NAVY

On June 26, 1917, a large group of supply ships sailed into
the West Coast of France.

British and American Navies made a massive blockade laying
50,000 mines between Scotland and Norway.  The German
submarines had a difficulty crossing the barrier to reach
the open sea.  As a result losses of the Allies were cut by
90%.

NOTES:



THE GERMAN ADVANCE BEGINS

By winter of 1917, Germany had the advantage.  On the
Southern-Front, the Italians were crushed by Germany and
Austria-Hungary in the Battle of Caporetto.

On March 21, 1918, Germany made a massive attack on France
and vowed to take Paris.

NOTES:



THE ALLIES TAKE THE OFFENSIVE

Planes were fitted with radios, bombs and machine guns.  By
November 1918, the Germans pushed through the Sudan and
broke the German communication lines.  Germany's allies
pulled out of the war and Germany alone remained at war with
the Allies.

NOTES:



TRENCH WARFARE

NOTES:



THE ARMISTICE

On November 11, 1918, the hostilities ceased.  Germany had
to leave immediately all occupied areas.

Armistice: "Temporary suspension of hostilities by agreement
of truce."

NOTES:



WILSON'S FOURTEEN POINTS

NOTES:



THE TREATY OF VERSAILLES

NOTES:



THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS

NOTES:


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Click here to return to OFCN's Academy Curricular Exchange

Click here to return to OFCN's Academy
Click here to return to OFCN's Main Menu

----------------------------------------------------------------------

John Kurilecjmk@ofcn.org